Monday, March 20, 2017

OSHA warns recovery workers, employers and public of storm cleanup hazards

Tornado Preparedness and ResponseAs residents in Kansas and Missouri recover from the damage caused by recent tornadoes and severe storms, OSHA urges caution during cleanup and recovery efforts. Workers, employers and the public should be aware of hazards they may encounter, and steps needed to stay safe and healthy. "Recovery work should not put you in the recovery room," said Karena Lorek, OSHA's area director in Kansas City. "Our main concern is the safety and health of the workers and volunteers conducting cleanup activities." OSHA representatives are available in hard-hit areas to communicate with emergency responders, provide advice and distribute educational resources to assist in a safe clean-up of damage. For more information, see the news release.

NIOSH releases sound app to help protect workers from hearing loss

NIOSH Sound Level Meter appThe National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has developed a new, free mobile application for iOS devices that measures sound levels in workplaces. The NIOSH Sound Level Meter app displays real-time noise exposure data based on NIOSH and OSHA limits. The easy-to-use app can be particularly helpful to occupational safety and health trainers as they teach construction apprentices about noise hazards and the need for hearing protection. Visit the app webpage for more information.

OSHA's $afety Pays Program shows employers how workplace injuries and illnesses impact their bottom line

$afety Pays ProgramOSHA has updated the $afety Pays Program to include the most recent workers' compensation data from the National Council on Compensation Insurance. The program helps employers understand the impact of workplace injuries and illnesses on their company's profitability. OSHA provides many resources to help employers develop an effective safety and health program to improve safety and reduce costs. Benefits include reduced absenteeism, lower turnover and workers' compensation costs, higher productivity and increased morale.

Nationwide Safe + Sound Week event being held June 12-18 to promote safety and health programs

Safe + Sound WeekOSHA, the National Safety Council, the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the American Society of Safety Engineers, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health a have announced June 12-18 as Safe + Sound Week. The event is a nationwide effort to raise awareness of the value of workplace safety and health programs. These programs can help employers and workers identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving the bottom line. Throughout this week, organizations are encouraged to host events and activities that showcase the core elements of an effective safety and health program--management leadership, worker participation, and finding and fixing workplace hazards. Visit the Safe + Sound Week webpage to sign-up for email updates on the event.

National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls set for May 8-12

Last year, more than 1,900 workers participated in a stand-down event at the construction site of the MGM Casino in Oxon Hill, Md.Employers and workers are invited to participate in the fourth annual National Safety Stand-Down to prevent falls in construction, to be held May 8-12. Sponsored by OSHA, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and CPWR — The Center for Construction Research and Training, the weeklong outreach event encourages employers and workers to pause during the work day to talk about fall hazards and prevention. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry – accounting for 37 percent of fatalities industry-wide. In past years, more than 1 million workers participated in events. They have worked for public and private sector employees and small and large businesses. The event has recently expanded to include industries beyond construction. For more information on how to join in this year’s stand-down, access free training and education resources in English and Spanish, and receive a personalized certificate of participation, visit OSHA's webpage.

Delay of beryllium rule effective date proposed to allow for further review

Beryllium productsOSHA is proposing to delay the effective date of the rule entitled Occupational Exposure to Beryllium, from March 21 to May 20 to allow for further review and consideration. The extension is in keeping with a Jan. 20 White House memorandum that directed the review of any new or pending regulations. It would not affect the compliance dates of the beryllium rule. Comments on the proposed delay will be accepted through March 13 and can be submitted at www.regulations.gov. For more information, see the news release.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Employers reminded to post injury and illness summaries through April

OSHA's Form 300AOSHA reminds employers of their obligation to post a copy of OSHA's Form 300A, which summarizes job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2016. The summary must be displayed from February through April in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees and those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from OSHA recordkeeping and posting requirements.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Free hazard communication webinar to be offered by American Staffing Association Feb. 28

Chemical managementThrough its alliance with OSHA, the American Staffing Association will host a free webinar Feb. 28 at 3 p.m. ET on “Communicating with Workers about Hazardous Materials.” The webinar will focus on how OSHA can help staffing firms and host employers better understand their responsibilities for ensuring the safety of temporary workers. During this webinar, OSHA Senior Industrial Hygienist Sven Rundman will discuss the hazard communication standard, and responsibilities for providing hazard communication information and training. For more information and to register, visit the webinar website.

Ladder safety is focus of national outreach campaign

National Ladder Safety MonthFalls from ladders are preventable, and yet they account for about 20,000 injuries and 300 deaths each year. On March 2, agency staff will discuss lessons from the field during a safety symposium hosted by the OSHA Education Center at the University of Texas, Arlington. The safety discussion, from 9 to 11:30 a.m., will also be live-streamed and can be viewed online. The event is organized in conjunction with the American Ladder Institute’s declaration of March as Ladder Safety Month. OSHA area directors Jack Rector and Basil Singh will share stories of ladder-related tragedies they have witnessed, along with ways those incidents could have been prevented. Ladder safety will also be an important component of OSHA’s annual National Safety Stand-Down set for May 8 through 12.

OSHA's free On-site Consultation Program helped more than 27,000 employers create safer workplaces in 2016

On-site Consultation ProgramLast year, 27,385 small and mid-sized U.S. businesses took advantage of OSHA's free and confidential On-site Consultation Program to remove workplace hazards and better protect their workers. The program primarily benefits small and mid-sized businesses – 57% of those helped last year had fewer than 26 employees. Priority is given to high-hazard industries, with more than half of all visits going to construction or manufacturing sites. In 2016, consultants identified and helped employers eliminate more than 140,000 total hazards, protecting an estimated 3.3 million workers from possible injury, illness or death.